Too Cold In The Summer. Too Hot In The Winter. How To Beat The Weather In Your Office

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You would think that today’s technology, and our ability to moderate and control the temperature of indoor spaces, would allow offices around the country to be havens of temperate bliss. A delightfully mild setting in which we can escape the sometimes hellacious, sometimes frozenly hellacious, elements of nature. In this perfect scenario, we come in, sit down and get to work without ever having to worry about regulating our body temperature. Unfortunately, this utopian image of office spaces doesn’t exist.

What does exist is a strange, and often times demoralizing, reality of the temperature inside the office being the exact opposite of the temperature outside. A cold winter morning is met with a sweltering office, and a hot summer morning is met with bone-chillingly cold office – that is only made worse by the aforementioned layer of sweat currently resting on your body.

The sad truth is that unless you run your own office space and have control over the thermostat, you’re probably not going to be able to do much more than adjust your interaction with your office to moderate your body temperature. It’s not the best-case scenario, but it’s what we’ve got and we’re gonna make it work. Here’s how:

WELL, CLOTHES, OBVIOUSLY

First things first, the obvious solution is to wear or bring articles of clothing that will help keep you comfortable. In the winter, when the office is an obscene 82 degrees, that may mean wearing a short-sleeve shirt, or a long-sleeve shirt and rolling the sleeves up. It may also mean layering your outfit so that when you get into the office, you can take off your coat and sweater to reveal the comfortable t-shirt (if permitted) underneath.

Summer brings with it a slightly different set of obstacles in that we usually don’t want to wear or bring more clothing to work than we have to, especially in places with excessive heat and humidity. My advice for you here would simply be to bring a sweater to work one day and leave it there. It’ll come in handy when the air conditioner is blasting an ungodly 64 degrees.

FOOD AND DRINK

This is going to go against any and all of your instincts, but on a hot day (aka a cold day in the office) one of the best ways to regulate your temperature and keep your body warm is to drink hot liquids. It could be coffee or tea, or just a simple cup of hot water (maybe add in some lemon and honey and you’ve got yourself a nice little treat), but the warmth, and benefits, are sure to follow.

The same goes for hot food. I know soup doesn’t sound all that appealing in mid-July, but it beats shivering at your desk.

Now, if you’re feeling yourself to be a little warmer than you’d like at work, just take that previous tip, turn it upside down get you some “cold” food - this will likely require a refrigerator, but should also help keep your core temperature down and comfortable – and some cold drink. A nice glass of ice water, or maybe an iced coffee if you feel your energy slipping.

NATURE’S REGULATOR

Surprise! The most effective way to warm yourself up, or cool yourself down, in the office is to submit yourself to nature. That’s right, if you’re cold in the office on a summer day, find a window and bask in the glory of the [174 quadrillion watts](http://www.yourturn.ca/solar/solar-power/how-much-power-does-the-sun-give-us/] of sun power coming to our small space rock. Trust me, it’s more than enough to warm you up if you’re feeling a little chilly behind that glass.

The same can be said for winter – though not with regard to the sun. Unless your office is new and the windows are amazingly insulated, there is going to be some level of coolness finding its way into your space. Just hop on over to the nearest window, press your hands or arms against it, and enjoy the cooling sensation you never though you wanted in the dead of winter.

Until next time – stay cozy out there.

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Arye

When Arye isn't helping optimize your time, he is doing his part to ensure life is full of shenanigans.